wooing: watch n’ learn, kids

April 18, 2007 – 12:58 am

things we say to the blogwife in the bubble bath: “if you put more of that oil in the water, the bubbles would last longer.”

blogwife: “well, duh. more oil … more bubbles.”

blog (clearing throat): “not more bubbles. think surfactants! a larger relative amount of bubble-causing protein solution would mean a less brittle bubble surface, a slower rate of surfactant drainage and a longer lasting foam — not unlike your perpetually downy breves. hoffmann says so!”

blogwife: “who said you aren’t romantic?”

blog: “if you give me a few minutes, i’ll figure out how to work in an edgy reference to beta-lactoglobulin.”

UPDATE: hoffmann asked for it:


alas, there be no ingredients listed. what kinda low-class, text-addled bubble bath did you expect this blog to be using, anyway?

the burning question now is … if oil is actually bad for foam, as mr. foodie tells us (in the comments), then why is bubble bath and dish soap and shampoo always so dang oily? isn’t oil, and its permutations, an obvious protein — making it ideal for surfactant use? and if not, then why did that cod oil macchiato get so flaming stiff and froofy?!

UPDATE: ah-HA! just because it cares, this blog has been reading the back of its shampoo bottle, which tells us that, just after water, the biggest ingredient is ammonium lauryl sulfate — which, according to googlable sources, is BOTH “a foaming agent” AND an oil! (coconut oil, to be specific … scroll down to the paragraph that begins “Now lets talk about” …) soooo. how, exactly, is oil bad for foam?

p.s. does this blog know what it’s talking about? it does not. is it thoroughly confused by the dueling authorities of mr. hoffmann and wikipedia? it is. but it’s becoming a bit more possible that its initial wild display of limited chemistry knowledge before the blogwife wasn’t entirely wrong!

we will, at some point, try to relate all this to the making of actual coffee beverages. we promise.

UPDATE: annnnnnd, we have our beverage tie-in … specifically, the extreme desirability of bipolar, sulfolipidic oils in cases of mixing and foaming. anyone in need of an obscure, stress-addled competition signature beverage? anyone? anyone?